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Interlude: MUSIC FOR THE POMPOUS KNOW-IT-ALL

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Sonata For The Pompous Know-It-All

Discussion 44 Comments

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    Phagocytic Lifeforms Trip on Trypsin 17-iv-2019

    Audio Esemplasm



    A musky musical polemic on the interpenetration of opposites in the sagging belly of the beast, this edition of Late Lunch with Out To Lunch was broadcast from Resonance 104.4FM 2-3pm on Wednesday 17th April 2019 as Extinction Rebellion occupied significant areas of Central London and installed trees all the way across Waterloo Bridge.

    Opinions on the efficacity of disruption as a political tactic were divided, but OTL was moved to poetry:

    "In the deleterious shopping-machine of my dyspeptic agency," quoth he, "Nothing comes to parse the ricochet of my innumerable crotchets, except the sumptuous overlay of this man's crumpet. Aspirations to 'saintly' abstinence condemn all action around as sin, while in the belly of the beast, phagocytic lifeforms trip on trypsin*. The evolving total movement melts my poise, my poisoned individual pie, which keeps on speaking the same irrational number. Extinction Rebellion was set up by a hundred noble scientists (echoes of CND here), concerned that we are heading for Earth's sixth mass-extinction event. For his 80th birthday party in a Tufnell Park hostelry, Trotskyist Ian Birchall asked for no presents - but donations to ER instead. We at AMM Central laugh in the face of Euro elections ... is that a punishable offence? Fractal fruitcake fashions seeming-tell-tale squirms on the narrow verge of our motorway madness, the monobiology of what's deemed controversy. Sail away into a blue sky called freedom! Stop to count the cost!! Riff on reified layers!!! Tomato-juice mysticism? Prelapse preamble? Ambulatory Cistercians. Grunt cheeses. Dry fields of sedge to set before a king ...".

    AMM All-Stars persisted this week of: Out To Lunch - word jazz (see above); piano; mouthnoise; ogre google-gargle (aka low grumbles), organ'n'splash'n'klang (prerecorded); live mix; post-production; photography; Dave Black - electric guitar, marxist grumbles; Paul Shearsmith - trumpet, squeakers, Baliphone, Jew's harp, tubular bell, tankie grumbles; Graham Davis - Korg Kaossillator, vegetarian grumbles; Peter Baxter - drums, tummy grumbles. Halftime singles were "Roma Violentia" (1975) and "Metello" (1970), film title themes by Ennio Morricone, the second overdubbed into something else by the All-Dubs ...

    * Not strictly true. Trypsin is a digestive enzyme which breaks down protein, allowing amino-acids to pass through the gut wall into the bloodstream. Phagocytes are blood cells which eat bacteria and decaying cells. Without trypsin supplying amino acids, phagocytes couldn't exist, but whether its presence causes phagocytes to "trip" in moot. To put it more precisely, Trypsin contains an "oxyanion hole" formed by the backbone amide hydrogen atoms of Gly-193 and Ser-195, which through hydrogen bonding stabilize the negative charge which accumulates on the amide oxygen after nucleophilic attack on the planar amide carbon by the serine oxygen causes that carbon to assume a tetrahedral geometry.

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      First,

      Main blog post. My partner in crime doing his thing every Friday.

      AMM All Stars...well, stars...one of the great free improvising outfits of the 21cent.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      Nancarrow’s piano rolls...just...just...so necessary and brilliant.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      One of Derek’s last, if not last, recordings.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      Some early midi shit. Earlier renditions of constructions, devised and conjured out of of nowhere (shout out to my partner in musical crime and friend), completed on much earlier computers and Logic software using other earlier sympathiser generated sounds, moved across to a much more recent version of Logic, on a better computer, and rejigged and revised using “better” (apparently) sampled sounds, but now actually out of date...however I couldn’t give a shit...still dig listening to it even if I say so myself, which I do!

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      A record by Eugene Chadbourne and Frank Lowe that had one of the majorist influences, if not the most majorist, on my somewhat checkered and very questionable musical “career”...fuck, making myself laugh!

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      It’s Frank, what can I say...enjoy and smile.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      “The present-day composer refuses to die”, Eddie Varese

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      What can I say...I consider this to be the closest I’ve got to musical honesty so far...whatever that is...and I like listening to it...like smelling your own farts...

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019


      “Well, Yeah, like, based on memories of being a kid hearing various marching bands playing different tunes in the same area, I would get this one marching band going down the street from one way...then I would have this other marching band coming from down some that way or street...then they would converged...and it was this like musical cacophony of competing rhythms and melodies was created that kind of like just blended together into this thing, this brilliant sonic storm, that I just like thought was really genius and that would attract all my attention, like a gigantic mind magnet, you know ...so sometimes, I decided to kind of replicate that experience in me other musical constructions...cool huh?” (A made up quote, by me, from Charles Ives himself giving at least one reason why he composes music like he does.)

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      One of them earlier midi pieces that actually sat in the hard drive of the computer for years as a set of chords, to which later I sung, slowly, and bit by bit moused in, a melody...still dig it...note the very simple bass and percussion cross rhythms underneath...pathetic, I know, but it amuses me.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      What bloody modern, so-called “abstract” artists, contemporary visual people doing non-figurative stuff should really be listening to and inspired by. Not bloody Dire Straits, Pink Bloody Floyd, Velvet Bloody Underground, Phillip Friggin’ Glass or Steve friggin’ Reich or David Friggin’ Bowie...for fuck sake.

      “As for the scribbles, drawings that amass reflex movements of a pencil into patterns reminiscent of work by Henri Michaux, Cy Twombly or Jean Dubuffet (who was profoundly affected by this material and its implications), Prinzhorn saw them as fundamental acts of existence:

      Even the simplest scribble … is, as a manifestation of expressive gestures, the bearer of psychic components and the whole sphere of psychic life lies as if in perspective behind the most insignificant form element. We can call the impulse for the drawing gesture specifically the expressive need. Beyond that we must speak of an activating impulse which we also consider a basic fact of all life and which we distinguish from the expressive need despite their close relationship.

      Dubuffet extrapolated these ideas into a personal practice that came to be known as art brut or raw art, invested in ‘values of savagery … instinct, passion, mood, violence, madness’. Without Prinzhorn and Dubuffet the current stature of so-called outsider artists such as Adolf Wölfli and Henry Darger would be unimaginable. As a music lover who often played piano (interpreting Duke Ellington compositions), bagpipes, accordion and harmonium improvisations, it was a logical step for Dubuffet to translate these instinctual, ‘savage’ gestures of the hand into the sonic realm. Musique Phénoménal was recorded by Dubuffet and Asger Jorn between December 1960 and March 1961, then released in that year in an extremely limited edition of four 10-inch records. Photographs show them playing ethnographic and Western instruments: shawm, curved animal horn, thumb piano, nose flute, bassoon, siren, double whistle, hurdy gurdy and a variety of stringed instruments, many of them sourced from musician Alain Vian (Boris Vian’s brother), proprietor of a Parisian shop specializing in unusual collectable instruments. Dubuffet had travelled in the Sahara and found his taste for the music of his own culture diminishing accordingly.

      ‘Towards the end of 1960, around Christmas time,’ Dubuffet wrote,

      my friend Asger Jorn, the Danish painter, invited me round to improvise music with him. I bought a Grundig TK35 tape recorder to capture the spirit of our get-togethers and the first recording of our recreations, done on 27th December was entitled ‘Nez Cassé’ (broken nose). Many more were soon to follow as we were both so enthralled by these musical experiments that our improvisation sessions were very frequent over the succeeding months.

      Though both of them had some musical facility there was no intention of making something polished. Dubuffet felt the same about being a novice in tape recording, preferring the work of amateur technicians who lack the expertise to make perfect documents, remote from the messiness of daily life.

      He also made a distinction between music we make and music we listen to. One was a composite of inner moods and motivations mixed with the everyday ambient sounds that are an involuntary constant of living. The other is music that is created to be heard. The sounds of the latter Dubuffet considered to be beyond natural tendencies: ‘It is not human at all and could lead us to hear (or imagine) sounds which would be produced by the elements themselves, independent of human intervention.’

      His own preferences were for a music ‘not structured according to a particular system but unchanging, almost formless, as though the pieces had no beginning and no end but were simply extracts taken haphazardly from a ceaseless and ever-flowing score’.” (David Toop, Into The Maelstrom)

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      The Japanese...gotta love ‘em...they can and do do everything...dig Aoki, and my sister reckons he’s rather attractive too!

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      Another partner in musical crime who lives in that wonderfully musically fertile desert area of the States that saw the birth of Captain Beefheart and Frank.

    • Boulder Dash 22nd Apr 2019

      Their musical birth of sorts, not their actually biological one.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      England’s modern day composer who refuses to die or even just go away.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      Acoustic bass...gotta love it...

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 22nd Apr 2019

      Another wonder from my partner in musical crime and insane friend.

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      Come on, his name is Mr Crumb...!

  • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 21st Apr 2019

      Read Kafka’s In The Penal Colony, then listen to this...or just listen to it anyway cause it’s cool.

  • Boulder Dash 22nd Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 22nd Apr 2019

      Forgot the great man...who once drove off the highway into the Mojave desert to calm down after reading a bumper sticker that read, If Van Gogh we’re alive today, he’d use British Paints.

      Who once stayed up for a whole year and lost all his friends.

  • Boulder Dash 22nd Apr 2019

    • Boulder Dash 22nd Apr 2019

      Who once went to see Thelonious Monk play some important gig. It was packed and he was up the back. Crammed in. Monk was hours late. When he finally appeared many booed and jeered. Thelonious picked up a vase of flowers and hurled it into the piano, hit one note and walked out. Everyone booed and jeered except the Captain, Don Van Vliet, he clapped for half an hour. He said, “It was the right note.”

  • Boulder Dash 24th Apr 2019

    “...since the birth of the State, the world of politics has always been and continues to be the stage for unlimited rascality and brigandage, brigandage and rascality which, by the way, are held in high esteem, since they are sanctified by patriotism, by the transcendent morality and the supreme interest of the State. This explains why the entire history of ancient and modern states is merely a series of revolting crimes; why kings and ministers, past and present, of all times and all countries – statesmen, diplomats, bureaucrats, and warriors – if judged from the standpoint of simple morality and human justice, have a hundred, a thousand times over earned their sentence to hard labor or to the gallows. There is no horror, no cruelty, sacrilege, or perjury, no imposture, no infamous transaction, no cynical robbery, no bold plunder or shabby betrayal that has not been or is not daily being perpetrated by the representatives of the states, under no other pretext than those elastic words, so convenient and yet so terrible: “for reasons of state.” Mikhail Bakunin ( Federalism, Socialism, Anti-Theologism-1867 )

  • Boulder Dash 27th Apr 2019